Links for March 11, 2012

Depression: A genetic Faustian bargain with infection? [Emily Deans/Evolutionary Psychiatry]. Discusses the Pathogen Host Defense (PATHOS-D) theory of depression described by Raison and Miller [pdf]. Genes that make people susceptible to depression may also protect them from infection. Depression is associated with brain inflammation; inflammation is also part of the immune response that combats infectious disease. “Since infections in the developing world tend to preferentially kill young children, there is strong selection pressure for genes that will save you when you are young, even if those genes have a cost later in life.”

The people of the petabyte [Venkatesh Rao/Forbes blogs]. An “informal taxonomy and anthropological survey of data-land” based on Rao’s observations at the Strata conference. Apparently everyone’s a data scientist now:

The taxonomy part is simple. Apparently the list of species in data land is very short. It has only one item:

  • Data scientist

What is the value of big data research vs. good samples [from LinkedIn Advanced Business Analytics, Data Mining and Predictive Modeling group]. Interesting and lengthy discussion from LinkedIn’s Advanced Business Analytics, Data Mining, and Predictive Modeling group on whether/when sampling vs. big data sets should be used.

The real-world experiment: New application development paradigm in the age of big data [James Kobielus/Forrester].

This year and beyond, we will see enterprises place greater emphasis on real-world experiments as a fundamental best practice to be cultivated and enforced within their data science centers of excellence.  In a next best action program, real-world experiments involve iterative changes to the analytics, rules, orchestrations, and other process and decision logic embedded in operational applications. You should monitor the performance of these iterations to gauge which collections of business logic deliver the intended outcomes, such as improved customer retention or reduced fulfillment time on high-priority orders.

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2 responses to “Links for March 11, 2012

  1. Jim Stephens

    Anne? Is this you? Former teacher @ DSST? I came across your site while researching combinatorial creativity.

  2. Yep, it’s me, Jim. I’m fascinated by the idea of combinatorial creativity. Seems right on to me.