Daily Links 07/01/2014

I’m going to argue here that a business model that could make money for software companies, while benefiting users, is creating an open market for data. Yes, your data. For sale. On an open market. For anyone to buy. Privacy is dead. Isn’t it time we leverage the death of privacy for our own gain?

The idea is to create an ecosystem around the production, consumption, and exploitation of data so that all the players can get the energy they need to live and prosper.

You need a custom MapReduce programmer every time you want to get something out of Hadoop, but that’s not the case for Spark, said Mathew. Alteryx is working toward a standardized Spark interface for asking questions directly against data sets, which broadens Spark’s accessibility from hundreds of thousands of data scientists to millions of data analysts — folks who know who to write SQL queries and model data effectively, but aren’t experts in writing MapReduce programming jobs in Java.

The Spark framework is well equipped to handle those queries, as it exploits the memory spread across all of the servers in a cluster. That means it can run analytics models at blazing-fast speeds compared to MapReduce: Programs can go as much as 100 times faster in memory or 10 times faster on disk. Those performance enhancements — and the subsequent customer demand – has prompted Hadoop distribution vendors like Cloudera and MapR to support Spark.

Namely, as enterprise applications become more data-centric, the roles of data scientist and application developer are merging. In the short-term, this means the two roles must learn collaborate more effectively and both must assume new ways of thinking. For data scientists, this means starting to think more about how the insights they uncover can be translated into repeatable form factors consumable by end-users. And application developers need to gain a better understanding of data flows and how analytic requirements impact application performance.

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